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The effects of red meat on health have been heavily studied.
However, most of these studies are observational, meaning that they are designed to detect associations but cannot prove causation (cause and effect).
Observational studies tend to have confounding variables — factors other than the ones being studied that might be influencing the outcome variable (10Trusted Source).
For example, an observational study may find that people who eat a lot of red meat have worse health outcomes.
However, perhaps this group of people may be more likely to smoke, drink alcohol frequently, or engage in other behaviours that contribute to undesirable health effects compared with those who do not eat red meat.
It not impossible to control for all of these factors and determine if red meat is a “cause” of any health outcome. That limitation is important to keep in mind when reviewing the research and determining if red meat is something you would like to incorporate into your regular diet.
Red meat and heart disease
Several observational studies show that red meat is associated with a greater risk of death, including from heart disease
Nevertheless, it appears that not all red meat has the same health effects. Plus, it is important to remember the limitations of observational studies.
A large study including 134,297 individuals found that high intake of processed meat (150 or more grams per week) was significantly associated with an increased risk of death and heart disease.
However, no association was found for unprocessed red meat consumption, even in amounts of 250 or more grams per week .
Randomised controlled trials — which are considered to be higher quality than observational studies — appear to support these results.
One review of controlled studies concluded that eating half a serving (1.25 ounces), or more of unprocessed red meat daily does not adversely affect heart disease risk factors, such as blood lipids and blood pressure levels.
One of the reasons processed meats may be associated with heart disease risk is the high salt content. Excessive sodium intake has been linked to high blood pressure .
Overall, it is unclear if, how, and why unprocessed or processed red meats are connected to heart disease. We need more high quality studies to help contextualise the data.
Red meat and cancer
Observational studies also show that red meat consumption is associated with an increased risk of certain cancers, especially colorectal and breast cancers .
Similar to the studies on heart disease, it appears that the type of meat makes a difference.
Consumption of processed red meats, like bacon and sausage, has been linked to an increased risk of colorectal cancer. This does not appear to be true for unprocessed red meats.
What is more, a review of studies found that high processed meat intake was associated with a larger increase in breast cancer risk compared with high unprocessed meat intake.
It is not fully understood how processed meats increase the risk of certain cancers.
However, it is thought that using nitrites to cure meat and smoking meats can produce carcinogenic (cancer-causing) compounds. High heat cooking, such as grilling, may also create cancer-promoting compounds.
The way red meat is cooked also affects how it influences your health. When meat is cooked at a high temperature, it can form harmful compounds.
These include heterocyclic amines (HCAs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) .
According to the National Cancer Institute, lab experiments suggest these compounds may change DNA and promote cancer development.
More research is needed, though.
Here are some tips to minimise the formation of these substances when cooking red meat.
Use gentler cooking methods, like stewing and steaming, instead of grilling and frying.
Minimise cooking at high heats and do not expose your meat directly to a flame.
Limit charred and smoked food. If your meat is burnt, cut away the charred pieces.
If you must cook at a high heat, flip your meat frequently to prevent it from burning.
Soak your meat in a marinade, like one made with honey and herbs, before cooking. Marinating may help decrease the formation of HCAs.
By Kevin Nengia
FG Scraps PCR Test For Fully Vaccinated Travellers
Kidney Disease: Expert Harps On Healthy Life Style
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The Head, Prevention and Communication Unit, Delta State Agency for the Control of HIV/AIDS (DELSACA), Mr Mike Arinze, has called on the media to ensure that it gives adequate publicity to Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and self-testing in the fight against HIV/AIDS.
Arinze, who made the call recently in an exclusive interview shortly after a three-day training for key stakeholders and the media on PrEp and self-testing (HIVST) Communication Strategy, noted that the media’s involvement in the training put them in better stead to carry out due enlightenment to the populace.
“These are media personnel that work in many media platforms. The knowledge they have and the capacity that has been built in them will enable them educate the populace through their programming and reportage in their different media platforms”, he said.
While noting the power of the media in information dissemination, he emphasised on the need for the media to create adequate awareness on the PrEP and self-testing kits, which are innovatives in the fight against HIV/AIDS.
“They need to step it (the training) down to the viewing, listening, and reading population so that people will know that the service is available, accessible, and ultimately aims to ensure that we limit new infections to the barest minimum”, he said.
Speaking on the importance of the training to the media, the HIV Programme Manager, Rivers State Agency for the Control of HIV/AIDS (RIVSACA), Dr Naaziga Francis, acknowledged the existence of knowledge gap in the media about PrEP and self-test, which the three-day training has filled.
“This training is a novel thing, which is why we brought media practitioners to have indepth knowledge and understanding of what is happening in HIV/AIDS programming.
“If they are well informed, they can adequately inform the wider audience”, he said.
The RIVSACA boss stated further that adequate publicity to PrEP and self-testing will protect the over 92 percent of Nigerians who are HIV negative.
PrEP is a medicine taken to prevent contracting HIV. It is highly effective for preventing HIV when taken as prescribed, and reduces the risk of contracting HIV through sex by about 99 percent.
Self Test, on the other hand, is testing oneself at home, using the new HIV self-test kit.
By: Sogbeba Dokubo
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Fully vaccinated inbound travellers would no longer be required to take a pre-departure PCR COVID-19 test, the Federal Government said on Monday.
The Federal Government said they would, however, be subjected to a rapid antigen test at the airport by the NCDC within the arrival hall of the airport free of charge.
The decision was coming after the complaints by many travellers over the cost placed on the PCR test.
The Secretary to the Government of the Federation and the Chairman, Presidential Steering Committee on COVID-19, Boss Mustapha, disclosed this at the National briefing of the committee in Abuja.
He added that passengers who are unvaccinated or partially vaccinated are mandated to take a COVID-19 PCR test 48 hours before departure or do a Day 2 and day 7 test on arrival, noting that such passengers must pay for the tests.
Mustapha revealed that this directive would take effect from April 4.
He said, “The PSC has reviewed these situations around the world and applies such to the situation in Nigeria and have revised the International Travel Protocols, which should come into effect on Monday, 4th April 2022 as follows:
Inbound (fully vaccinated) passengers arriving in Nigeria will no longer be required to take a pre-departure PCR COVID-19 Test;
On arrival, for fully vaccinated passengers, a sample will be taken at the airport for rapid antigen test by the NCDC within the arrival hall of the airport;
Passengers who are unvaccinated or partially vaccinated shall take a COVID-19 PCR test 48 hours before departure, or do a Day 2 and day 7 test on arrival. Such passengers will be expected to pay for their PCR tests through the travel platform;
“Fully vaccinated passengers will not be charged for arrival rapid antigen tests at the airport;
Rules that apply to fully vaccinated adults also apply to children aged 10 – 18 years; they will not be required to have pre-arrival PCR tests but will have a sample taken at the arrival hall but not charged”
Mustapha urged all passengers travelling out of Nigeria to be fully vaccinated and to comply with COVID-19 protocols and requirements in their country of destination.
Giving update on the Nigerians evacuated from Ukraine, Mustapha said, the Port Health Services had so far screened about 2,357 persons out of the over 8,000 evacuated.
Of this figure, he said 193 tested positive for the coronavirus, adding that they are being managed in accordance with the protocols.
Published
on
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The effects of red meat on health have been heavily studied.
However, most of these studies are observational, meaning that they are designed to detect associations but cannot prove causation (cause and effect).
Observational studies tend to have confounding variables — factors other than the ones being studied that might be influencing the outcome variable (10Trusted Source).
For example, an observational study may find that people who eat a lot of red meat have worse health outcomes.
However, perhaps this group of people may be more likely to smoke, drink alcohol frequently, or engage in other behaviours that contribute to undesirable health effects compared with those who do not eat red meat.
It not impossible to control for all of these factors and determine if red meat is a “cause” of any health outcome. That limitation is important to keep in mind when reviewing the research and determining if red meat is something you would like to incorporate into your regular diet.
Red meat and heart disease
Several observational studies show that red meat is associated with a greater risk of death, including from heart disease
Nevertheless, it appears that not all red meat has the same health effects. Plus, it is important to remember the limitations of observational studies.
A large study including 134,297 individuals found that high intake of processed meat (150 or more grams per week) was significantly associated with an increased risk of death and heart disease.
However, no association was found for unprocessed red meat consumption, even in amounts of 250 or more grams per week .
Randomised controlled trials — which are considered to be higher quality than observational studies — appear to support these results.
One review of controlled studies concluded that eating half a serving (1.25 ounces), or more of unprocessed red meat daily does not adversely affect heart disease risk factors, such as blood lipids and blood pressure levels.
One of the reasons processed meats may be associated with heart disease risk is the high salt content. Excessive sodium intake has been linked to high blood pressure .
Overall, it is unclear if, how, and why unprocessed or processed red meats are connected to heart disease. We need more high quality studies to help contextualise the data.
Red meat and cancer
Observational studies also show that red meat consumption is associated with an increased risk of certain cancers, especially colorectal and breast cancers .
Similar to the studies on heart disease, it appears that the type of meat makes a difference.
Consumption of processed red meats, like bacon and sausage, has been linked to an increased risk of colorectal cancer. This does not appear to be true for unprocessed red meats.
What is more, a review of studies found that high processed meat intake was associated with a larger increase in breast cancer risk compared with high unprocessed meat intake.
It is not fully understood how processed meats increase the risk of certain cancers.
However, it is thought that using nitrites to cure meat and smoking meats can produce carcinogenic (cancer-causing) compounds. High heat cooking, such as grilling, may also create cancer-promoting compounds.
The way red meat is cooked also affects how it influences your health. When meat is cooked at a high temperature, it can form harmful compounds.
These include heterocyclic amines (HCAs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) .
According to the National Cancer Institute, lab experiments suggest these compounds may change DNA and promote cancer development.
More research is needed, though.
Here are some tips to minimise the formation of these substances when cooking red meat.
Use gentler cooking methods, like stewing and steaming, instead of grilling and frying.
Minimise cooking at high heats and do not expose your meat directly to a flame.
Limit charred and smoked food. If your meat is burnt, cut away the charred pieces.
If you must cook at a high heat, flip your meat frequently to prevent it from burning.
Soak your meat in a marinade, like one made with honey and herbs, before cooking. Marinating may help decrease the formation of HCAs.
By Kevin Nengia
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NSCDC Restates Commitment To Fight Oil Theft, Vandalism
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One reply on “Does Red Meat Have Health Benefits? (ll) – – The Tide”

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